Getting to Know Fast Food Meat, Part I

Getting to Know Fast Food Meat, Part I

I know real “foodies” (especially of the type that might do something like read a blog on all things meat) hate everything about fast food. And yes, I know from a political standpoint, yes, everything about fast food is messed up; destroying the rain forests, the homogenization of American culture, adding calories to the average urban dweller's diet with no positive outcome, I agree, these are all bad things. And yes, I know from a food stand point, fast food doesn't have much to recommend it since it's mostly all frozen and made of dubious ingredients to start out with.

At the same time, the recent Kentucky Fried Chicken (sorry I'm not going to call it KFC, it's still fried and shortening the words to the initials doesn't change that) television commercial, in which it is claimed that Kentucky Fried Chicken is made “in real kitchens by real chefs” got me to thinking about relative fast food tastiness. For folks who don't regularly eat fast food, perhaps they don't even know there is a difference.

But of course, there is, even amongst the most common of all fast food fare, the hamburger. The most beautiful of all fast food hamburgers is, of course, the 99 cents (give or take) hamburger found at the Portland, Oregon based chain, Burgerville. Burgerville claims that most of its ingredients are organic or at the very least natural, and I believe a majority of their burger meat actually comes from grassfed cows. That does make a difference even in a humble fast food hamburger.